Posts Tagged ‘Andy Dalton’

TCU 2011 Outlook– Passing Attack

Posted by    |    June 7th, 2011 at 9:29 pm

The Purple Wimple preview of TCU, part one: the quarterbacks, receivers, and tight ends (o-line to be previewed with the running game, in the next post).  Take

Pachall did a lot more rushing than passing in 2010.

 

off the number one, leaving a single numeral four; add a couple inches, replace about a dozen pounds with tattoos; darken the hair and the facial expression, and there emerges from the shadow of Andy Dalton the visage of the heir apparent, redshirt sophomore Casey Pachall.  That’s Pah-hall, writes TCU’s sports information director, recognizing that, to date, few have paid a lick of attention to 2011′s gunslinging quarterback since his recruitment the 2008 season.  The Brownwood star drew offers from Notre Dame, Florida, Oklahoma (and, truthfully, Texas, but the shorthorns conveniently forgot about it when Pachall committed to TCU, of all places).  Pachall enrolled early at TCU, and quietly slipped off most radar screens.   (more…)

2010 Mountain West Retrospective: Peaks

Posted by    |    February 8th, 2011 at 9:02 pm

Peaks has to be plural, because in the conference, Utah beat ‘em all too, except TCU.  Both teams featured game-changing return men (Smithson and Kerley were first and second in the conference, first and 15th nationally in punt returns) and entered the season favorites to win the conference and challenge for the non-cartel autobid to the BCS.  Both teams expected to rely on multi-pronged rushing attacks to compliment their potent air attacks.  The Utes’ Asiata-Wide thunder-lightning ground game did not disappoint, averaging 25 carries for over 118 yards a game for the first eight games.  TCU’s Tucker-Wesley-James-Dalton rushing game was dominant, averaging 40 carries for over 240 yards a game for the first nine games (James didn’t play in two games, and TCU had no bye before the trip to Utah). (more…)

Fourth Annual Purple Wimple Awards

Posted by    |    February 8th, 2011 at 11:39 am

Purple Wimple Player of the Year: Andy Dalton  

No single Horned Frog since LT has come to define TCU’s success over multiple years like Andy Dalton has defined it since 2008.  The red-head saved his best for last, his QB rating exceeding 166 this season, while turning in the fourth-best rush totals on the team.  Jeff Ballard’s best mark was 138 in ’06, with significantly less effective running.  And when it mattered most– on the road at Utah, and in the Rose Bowl– Dalton was near perfect.  He said all year that he and his team wished most to win another chance in the BCS, and to make the most of it, and they did just that.  En route, Dalton made the fast-rising signal callers at Baylor and Utah look silly.  The quarterback led his team to a second consecutive perfect regular season, and in sharp contrast to last year, Dalton took his team onto his shoulders in the bowl, and led them to victory.  The senior thoroughly outplayed his counterpart Badger, who had won the senior quarterback award for the season.  “I knew everything they were doing,” said Dalton of the Badgers.  Wisconsin’s quarterback, in contrast, couldn’t thread the Frogs coverages often, on those pass attempts when he wasn’t being slobber-knocked by purple-clad defensemen.  In end Dalton held the better trophy: Rose Bowl Offensive MVP.  Likely he’ll enter the NFL as a draftee.  TCU will miss this senior’s experience more than any other’s in years.  (more…)

Recruiting snippits: TCU and its foes

Posted by    |    February 8th, 2011 at 11:35 am

Kibbles and bits about the freshly inked classes of recruits of TCU and its opponents:

Air Force is an out-of-state school that flexes the Texas connection better than most of the others.  Its 13 Texan signees (caveat: because AFA signees must jump through more than the usual number of hoops actually to enroll at the Academy, its incoming freshman class is not known until fall) are tied with OU for the second biggest class of Texans enrolling elsewhere.  Oklahoma State inked 24 Texans.  The Falcons also signed six quarterbacks (quite to Gary Patterson’s tastes).  Tim Jefferson and Connor Dietz are a senior and a junior, respectively, so expect at least a couple of these freshmen to remain quarterbacks in college.  Many of the Falcons’ commits would have attracted a lot more offers if they had a couple more inches on them.  The classic case: QB Dano Graves is a MaxPreps national player of the year, accounting for 85 touchdowns last seasons (good grief!).  And he’s 5’9″ and got one 1A offer.  He took it. (more…)

TCU Football Year in Review

Posted by    |    January 10th, 2011 at 5:16 pm

Way back on September 2nd (only in football does three months a few days seem way back) the Wimple offered, as a public service, five reasons to curb our collective enthusiasm for the newborn football season.  Relax, was the message: 2009 rocked, and there’re a lot of good reasons to expect 2010, while good, not to exceed ’09.   Injuries might raise their ugly heads, and this year’s weakest link is backup quarterback.

“So pray for Andy Dalton’s durability, if you want the Frogs to top 2009 this year.  An inexperienced Pachall… isn’t going to best the Utes in Salt Lake City, or manhandle SDSU’s much-improved six-man secondary… in his first year.  So let’s hope he doesn’t have to.”

TCU’s ginger-headed gunslinger was one of the Frogs’ constants in 2010.

And, perhaps remarkably, the redshirt freshmen never had to take a snap with the outcome of the game in doubt.  Neither did the Frogs cave under the pressure to be perfect (another potential landmine noted in September), nor were the Frogs’ efforts in vain because Boise was more perfect than TCU.  In fact, speaking of Boise, perhaps it was a gift that this sentiment was true in September:

“Remember, Boise State put that monkey named You’re Still Not All That right back onto the Horned Frogs’ back in Glendale, and if history, including 2009, proves anything about TCU, it’s that the Frogs never—ever—get the monkey off their collective back.”  

And since 1938, that had been true, with exactly zero exceptions.  Andy Dalton and other Frogs said, over and over, how focused they were on returning to the BCS in 2010 and playing well; on purging the taste of the F-Bowl from their mouths.  It was Boise that, by besting the Frogs in Glendale, gave TCU the necessary motivation for success in Pasadena.

That success was a culmination of factors that were visible in September.  Two days following the article quoted above, your humble Wimple offered these five reasons to expect 2010 to exceed the heights of ’09.  (1) Andy Dalton and his receivers were all back; (2) Jake Kirkpatrick and his brethren in the trenches would dictate, not react; (3) the “ohmygawd backfield;” (4) a favorable schedule in which all the good teams came to Fort Worth (or Arlington), except Utah, and for that game Dalton’s greater experience than Utah’s Wynn’s would be the difference; and (5) with such a high starting ranking, TCU wouldn’t be passed by one-loss cartel teams.  

  Rimington winner Jake Kirkpatrick anchored the Frogs’ offensive line.

The story of TCU’s tremendous 2010 season is no less than the coming-true of every one of those good predictions, and (somehow!) the coming-false of every one of the bad predictions.  It is hard to fathom a more perfect season.  Dalton and his receivers indeed had a stellar year; Jake Kirkpatrick won the Rimington, and led a line that generally paved over opponents; the d-line was nearly as dominant; the backfield was outstanding; only one team registered a threat at Amon Carter Stadium, and the Utes’ poor quarterback was so thunderingly confused by TCU’s defense while Dalton had one of the best games of his career; and to top it off, the one-loss cartel teams in fact did not outrank TCU. (more…)