Posts Tagged ‘Air Force Falcons’

Air Force Falcons 2011 Football Outlook

Posted by    |    March 21st, 2011 at 9:24 pm

First in the spring series of previews of each of TCU’s opponents (in the order they complete spring drills) is the Air Force Academy.  Come 2011, AFA may feature its best offense in a generation, given the amount of returning experience it will have on that side of the ball.  Four starting linemen, the quarterback, both tailbacks, and three of the four receivers on the two deep return.  Really there is only one key cog to replace: fullback.  

AFA is auditioning three tailbacks and one a third-string backup at fullback to replace Jared Tew (pictured) and Nathan Walker’s production at fullback.

But the Falcon attack, that’s a big piece of the pie.  Seniors Jared Tew and Nathan Walker took 31 percent of the Falcons’ carries for 27 percent of their ground yards and 25 percent of their rushing touchdowns in 2010.  Three converted tailbacks, juniors Wesley Cobb and Anthony LaCoste and Brent Michaels are in the running to replace that production.   LaCoste and Michaels came to mind when Calhoun hinted in February that fullback “might be one of those spots where a young guy might be able to come in and get some snaps.” Cobb, who has a season of practice at the position, seemed to be in the lead early.  He is a touch small at 5-8, 195 pounds, hoping for 215 by August.  “I’m a little undersized but I bring a degree of tenacity,” Cobb said.  He says may have to settle for 205.  Junior Mike DeWitt (who was out most of last season with a knee injury), DeWitt is bigger, at 6-1 and 215 pounds, and is the only player who came to Air Force specifically to play the position.  He is still practicing with a knee brace, but said that he should ditch the brace after spring ball.There are a few more questions in the defense… 

…If brackets and basketball just fill your daily recommended allowance of vitamin F– meaning football, of course– you can read the the rest of this post at the TCU Channel.

2010 Mountain West Retrospective: Middl’uns

Posted by    |    February 8th, 2011 at 8:59 pm

Air Force, San Diego State, and BYU each beat all of the four bottom feeders in the conference. What San Diego State, BYU, and Air Force could not do was beat TCU or Utah, and that is what made them all “middle’uns” in 2010.  AFA and SDSU would tell you they also both beat BYU, but the record book indicates only the Falcons did; the mini-scandal surrounding BYU’s victory over the Aztecs has largely faded away, aided by the “makeup” replay miss in the Holy War that may or may not have cost the Cougars a final conference victory over the Utes. What came around, went around, and more or less the score evened out.

The Mountain West came this close to two major non-conference wins in Columbus and Norman. Missouri Tiger T.J. Moe sprung free (aided by a badly missed call) for a last-minute 68 yard scoring run to secure the win against the surprisingly punchy Aztecs. Earlier that afternoon, Air Force out-gained, out-ran, out-held, and in the end, out-mistaked Oklahoma to lose by three-points. These losses (add SDSU’s heart-breaker in Provo) kept AFA and SDSU out of the polls, and dinged the MWC’s reputation just enough to keep TCU out of the national championship discussion two months later. (more…)

Recruiting snippits: TCU and its foes

Posted by    |    February 8th, 2011 at 11:35 am

Kibbles and bits about the freshly inked classes of recruits of TCU and its opponents:

Air Force is an out-of-state school that flexes the Texas connection better than most of the others.  Its 13 Texan signees (caveat: because AFA signees must jump through more than the usual number of hoops actually to enroll at the Academy, its incoming freshman class is not known until fall) are tied with OU for the second biggest class of Texans enrolling elsewhere.  Oklahoma State inked 24 Texans.  The Falcons also signed six quarterbacks (quite to Gary Patterson’s tastes).  Tim Jefferson and Connor Dietz are a senior and a junior, respectively, so expect at least a couple of these freshmen to remain quarterbacks in college.  Many of the Falcons’ commits would have attracted a lot more offers if they had a couple more inches on them.  The classic case: QB Dano Graves is a MaxPreps national player of the year, accounting for 85 touchdowns last seasons (good grief!).  And he’s 5’9″ and got one 1A offer.  He took it. (more…)

TCU Football Year in Review

Posted by    |    January 10th, 2011 at 5:16 pm

Way back on September 2nd (only in football does three months a few days seem way back) the Wimple offered, as a public service, five reasons to curb our collective enthusiasm for the newborn football season.  Relax, was the message: 2009 rocked, and there’re a lot of good reasons to expect 2010, while good, not to exceed ’09.   Injuries might raise their ugly heads, and this year’s weakest link is backup quarterback.

“So pray for Andy Dalton’s durability, if you want the Frogs to top 2009 this year.  An inexperienced Pachall… isn’t going to best the Utes in Salt Lake City, or manhandle SDSU’s much-improved six-man secondary… in his first year.  So let’s hope he doesn’t have to.”

TCU’s ginger-headed gunslinger was one of the Frogs’ constants in 2010.

And, perhaps remarkably, the redshirt freshmen never had to take a snap with the outcome of the game in doubt.  Neither did the Frogs cave under the pressure to be perfect (another potential landmine noted in September), nor were the Frogs’ efforts in vain because Boise was more perfect than TCU.  In fact, speaking of Boise, perhaps it was a gift that this sentiment was true in September:

“Remember, Boise State put that monkey named You’re Still Not All That right back onto the Horned Frogs’ back in Glendale, and if history, including 2009, proves anything about TCU, it’s that the Frogs never—ever—get the monkey off their collective back.”  

And since 1938, that had been true, with exactly zero exceptions.  Andy Dalton and other Frogs said, over and over, how focused they were on returning to the BCS in 2010 and playing well; on purging the taste of the F-Bowl from their mouths.  It was Boise that, by besting the Frogs in Glendale, gave TCU the necessary motivation for success in Pasadena.

That success was a culmination of factors that were visible in September.  Two days following the article quoted above, your humble Wimple offered these five reasons to expect 2010 to exceed the heights of ’09.  (1) Andy Dalton and his receivers were all back; (2) Jake Kirkpatrick and his brethren in the trenches would dictate, not react; (3) the “ohmygawd backfield;” (4) a favorable schedule in which all the good teams came to Fort Worth (or Arlington), except Utah, and for that game Dalton’s greater experience than Utah’s Wynn’s would be the difference; and (5) with such a high starting ranking, TCU wouldn’t be passed by one-loss cartel teams.  

  Rimington winner Jake Kirkpatrick anchored the Frogs’ offensive line.

The story of TCU’s tremendous 2010 season is no less than the coming-true of every one of those good predictions, and (somehow!) the coming-false of every one of the bad predictions.  It is hard to fathom a more perfect season.  Dalton and his receivers indeed had a stellar year; Jake Kirkpatrick won the Rimington, and led a line that generally paved over opponents; the d-line was nearly as dominant; the backfield was outstanding; only one team registered a threat at Amon Carter Stadium, and the Utes’ poor quarterback was so thunderingly confused by TCU’s defense while Dalton had one of the best games of his career; and to top it off, the one-loss cartel teams in fact did not outrank TCU. (more…)

TCU 38, Air Force 7

Posted by    |    October 24th, 2010 at 9:58 pm

The Air Force Falcons continued their now-venerable tradition of collapsing against TCU when playing in Fort Worth. The Frogs doubled up the Falcons in almost every statistical category.  For the first time in the Wimple’s game-watching memory, TCU never punted in a game. (more…)