Archive for May, 2012

Eat a Peach

Posted by    |    May 28th, 2012 at 2:53 pm

Source:  Vimeo

In 1968 Roger Smith ate a peach during a break from work. When he was finished he took out a pocketknife and began carving the peach pit into a tiny pig. 43 years later the retired meter reader and cattle rancher from Culloeka, Tennessee has carved hundreds of peach seeds into hummingbirds, stingrays, gospel choirs, entire villages, even a baseball stadium with 100+ figures. “Given enough time,” says Smith, “I don’t think there is anything you can’t make out of a peach seed.”

Roger Smith’s unique art, inspiring talent, and fascinating life are the subject of a short (11 minute) documentary by filmmaker Stewart Copeland. The explores Smith’s process as well as his inspirations and presents a thoughtful portrait of a self-taught artist who’s distinctive art is as much a part of his rural Southern landscape as it is a reflection of it. (more…)

The Killing Joke by Sebastian Lopez

Posted by    |    May 21st, 2012 at 2:26 pm

A Short Film by Sebastian Lopez

The Killing Joke is a 15 minute suspense/fiction short film about a mysterious woman that finds a red balloon tied up to a curious little box on an eery derelict street. Using classic elements of suspense and working within a seventies aesthetic, ‘The Killing Joke’ is an action packed film that pays homage to some of the horror movies from that era.

(more…)

Road’s End

Posted by    |    May 20th, 2012 at 3:20 pm

 

Road’s End is my thesis film completed at Ringling College of Art + Design.

Address is Approximate

Posted by    |    May 19th, 2012 at 11:53 am

Google Street View stop motion animation short made as a personal project by director Tom Jenkins.

Story: A lonely desk toy longs for escape from the dark confines of the office, so he takes a cross country road trip to the Pacific Coast in the only way he can – using a toy car and Google Maps Street View.

Music by the wonderfull Cinematic Orchestra and the track is Arrival of the Birds – please buy the fantastic album here.

All screen imagery was animated – there are no screen replacements.

Produced, animated, filmed, lit, edited & graded by Tom Jenkins (theoryfilms.co.uk / facebook.com/theoryfilms - !NEW MAKING OF PICS ON FB PAGE! / @thetheoryUK / twitter.com/#!/thetheoryUK).

Shot using Canon 5d MkII, Dragonframe Stop Motion software and customised slider.

Attribution:  Vimeo, Tom Jenkins.

Reflection

Posted by    |    May 13th, 2012 at 3:00 pm

Many of us in Dallas fall into this category  –  we don’t stop to fully appreciate life.

The world is fascinating. People and cultures inspire us. Sadly, the fast paced lifestyles of our generation result in many not taking the necessary step back to soak in the existing world around us. Watch this film and appreciate and take notice of the beauty in life & culture that lies within our world.

The next time you notice something that strikes you as interesting, stop for a second, start powering on your camera, think about why it’s unique, and snap the shot before you miss it, and post it on YouPlusDallas. (more…)

The Hands of Hollywood

Posted by    |    May 10th, 2012 at 6:01 pm

Interesting work, and we echo the comment one viewer made, “Now this is the kind of thing that interests me. Catastrophes and burning issues are lazy documentary.  Engage me with the small details and the people and things that slip by unnoticed and you get my vote!”  We agree.

 

Human Face Video Mapping by Gaspar

Posted by    |    May 9th, 2012 at 6:50 pm

 

STAFF MEETING VIDEO: THE MOVIE NSFW – Language

Posted by    |    May 8th, 2012 at 5:24 am

Is this a film about an agency that makes films deciding to make a films about changing their products from major films to staff meeting films?   Line of the film:  It’s so meta it doesn’t even recognize itself without existing.  Really?  Who came up with meeting videos anyway?  Would this happen in Downtown Dallas?  Downtown Ft. Worth?  Frisco?  Did Miles Fisher get top billing over Charlize Theron?  Is it because he looks like Tom Cruise?  Would Tom Cruise take top billing over Charilze Theron?

Directed by Dave Green: http://www.davegreen.com

Starring Miles Fisher: http://milesfisher.com/
Charlize Theron
Shawn Levy
Max Landis
Kyle Mooney
Brian Sacca
Joe Cobden
Alex Beh
Written by Henry Gayden
Produced by Ryan Hendricks
DP: Benji Bakshi
Art: Nick Nakahara & Rachel Kondrath
AC: Ted Hayden

 

Benga: I Will Never Change

Posted by    |    May 6th, 2012 at 6:41 pm

Great little piece that is explained here.  “Directed by Us, which consists of Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor, this talented team selected 960 separate pieces of vinyl and then measured, cut, and then simulated a waveform to music.  Read and support the blog, see the pics, and watch the video.  Excerpts are provided below:

“..the first task for the pair was calculating exactly how many records per second would be needed. The process of readying the vinyl for filming took seven full working days, which including measuring and cutting each individual piece, as well as hand labelling, numbering and then finally polishing.”

“To animate the wave form, we built it and then carefully removed each individual record. This had to be done very gently as any shift in the position of the sculpture would result in the failure of the animation and as we had to literally destroy each piece of vinyl to get it off, there was only one chance to get it right. Once the sculpture was finally built, the animation process took about 30 hours.”

Nice work by Barrett and Taylor.

Lovely Monster: NSFW Language

Posted by    |    May 5th, 2012 at 3:14 pm

Sophia is a lovely 21-year-old girl with “a rare and very dangerous condition.” She’s a monster. It’s an accident of birth, and the condition restricts her life in many ways. In this “documentary” by Francisco Calabrese, you will eventually see how her condition manifests itself. NSFW language.

The film work and post production is excellent but seeing her “condition” demystifies the experience.  We would have preferred some other affliction or not reveal the affliction at all.